Hernia Thank You Page

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What is Hernia Repair?

  • There are many types of hernias that can occur at numerous anatomical sites.
  • A hernia is the defect, or hole, through which another structure starts to push through.
  • Hernias can be first-time occurrences or re-occur more than once.
  • Sometimes small hernias can be repaired by simply sewing the edges of the hole together, but this only applies to very small hernia defects.  For most hernias, a patch is required.

Hernia Repair Surgery is the most common operation performed worldwide, with over 1 million repairs performed yearly in the United States alone.

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Types of Hernia

When the diaphragm has an opening in the middle called the hiatus. When the hiatus is enlarged, the stomach can bulge up into the chest causing symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, reflux, chest pain, and trouble swallowing.

Symptoms:

  • Heartburn
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Pain or discomfort in the stomach or upper abdomen
  • Chest pain
  • Harsh or sour taste in the back of the throat
  • Bloating
  • Excessive belching

Surgery:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux or GERD with symptoms including regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, and/or heartburn that is no longer responsive to acid-blocking medications.
  • Strangulated hernia or obstruction – symptoms including the inability to have a bowel movement or pass gas, severe pain with eating, or persistent nausea and A strangulated hernia is an emergency situation, and often requires an emergency operation.

A defect, or abnormal opening, in the muscle or connective tissue layers that make up the abdominal wall caused by a weakness in the layers of the abdominal wall.

Symptoms:

  • A pain associated with a bulge in the groin, the bellybutton, or through a prior incision site from surgery.

Surgery:

  • These procedures are done through an open incision or laparoscopically (through small incisions) depending on the type of hernia and work required for repair.

For children, hernia development can be congenital and adults can develop this type of hernia as a result of strenuous activities, chronic cough, or chronic straining from difficulties with bowel movements or urination.

Symptoms:

  • Pain associated with a bulge in the groin is the first sign of an inguinal hernia. It can be a sharp pain or an ache that gradually gets worse.
  • Signs that the hernia is entrapped are tenderness, redness of the overlying sking, severe unceasing pain, and the bulge not being able to be reduced or pushed back in.

These are serious symptoms that must be treated immediately.

Surgery:

  • There are two general options for inguinal hernia repair: the open approach and the laparoscopic approach.
  • Our surgeons specialize in the laparoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair offering patients a shorter recovery and sooner return to daily activities.
  • For laparoscopic hernia repair, primary complications associated with the operation are not common.
  • For many patients after open or laparoscopic repair, there can be swelling and bruising of the abdominal wall and scrotal region. This is normal and will steadily resolve completely with time.

Forms in a previous incision from prior surgery  and is usually due to inadequate healing or excessive pressure on the abdominal wall scar. The incidence of a hernia forming in a previous abdominal scar is about 20% (or higher for people who are obese or active smokers).

Symptoms:

  • Pain is usually the first symptom regardless if they have a bulge or not.
  • Once the bulge is present, it can increase in size and gradually cause more symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.
  • If internal organs such as intestine becomes entrapped in the hernia defect, this can be life-threatening if left undiagnosed and untreated.

Surgery:

  • An incisional hernia is largely dependent on reducing or eliminating the tension present at the surgical site.
  • The method that is preferred by most hernia surgeons is a tension-free method and is used by most medical centers.

Appears as a grape sized lump in the inner or upper part of the thigh or groin.

Symptoms & Causes:

  • Painful lump that may disappear when you lie down.
  • Can occur when fatty tissue or part of an intestine, protrudes through into the groin area at the top of the inner thigh through a weak spot in the surrounding muscle wall of the abdomen and into the femoral canal.
  • Femoral hernias tend to occur more frequently in women due to the wider shape of the female pelvis.

Surgery:

  • The operation pushes the bulge back into place and helps to strengthen the abdominal wall.
  • Femoral hernia repair is a necessary procedure as this type of hernia has a high risk of intestinal strangulation, which is a potentially life-threatening.
  • Femoral hernia repair can be done through open surgery, or through laparoscopic surgery.
  • Femoral hernia repair has very few risks.

A protrusion, or abnormal bulge, that can be felt or seen over the belly button.

Symptoms & Causes:

  • This condition develops when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the muscle of the abdominal wall.
  • Umbilical hernias in children are caused by an opening in the abdominal wall that is present at birth.
  • The bulge can be seen and felt all the time or only when the child is crying, coughing, or straining during bowel movements. This protrusion may disappear when the child is relaxed.
  • Can involve entrapment of internal organs such as intestine (persistent nausea and vomiting with severe abdominal pain and inability to pass gas or stool may have intestinal entrapment).

Surgery:

  • A small incision will be made at the base of the belly button where the bulging intestine where the intestine can be pushed back into its proper place, while the hernia sac is removed.
  • Multiple stitches are put in place around the muscle wall to prevent another hernia. The skin around the belly button will be then sewn down and attached to the underlying muscle so that the belly button looks like an “innie” instead of an “outie.”
  • In children, most umbilical hernias will go away on their own by age 3 or 4. If, however, the defect is greater than 2cm in diameter, it will need to be surgically repaired.
  • For adults, the decision to repair an umbilical hernia with mesh depends on the size of the hernia defect found at the time of surgery.
  • In adults, any symptomatic umbilical hernia should be evaluated for repair.

A strain or tear of the soft tissues in the groin area.  There is usually not a detectable hernia by exam or by imaging.

Symptoms & Causes

  • Commonly seen in athletes whose activity requires sudden change of directions, cutting movements, or twisting motions such as in ice hockey, soccer, wrestling, and football.
  • A Sports Hernia typically presents with acute pain in the groin area, or pain that progressively worsens over time and is exaggerated by certain movements.

Treatment

  • The first phase of treatment for an acute Sports Hernia is rest.
  • Your Sports Hernia specialist may also recommend ice, and anti-inflammatory medication for several weeks.
  • The second phase of treatment for Sports Hernia typically involves 6-8 weeks of physical therapy, concentrating on strengthening and balancing the muscles in the area of injury.

Types of Hernia

When the hiatus is enlarged, the stomach can bulge up into the chest causing symptoms such as heartburn, regurgitation, reflux, chest pain, and trouble swallowing.

Symptoms:

  • Heartburn
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Pain or discomfort in the stomach or upper abdomen
  • Chest pain
  • Harsh or sour taste in the back of the throat
  • Bloating
  • Excessive belching

When To Get Surgery:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux with symptoms including regurgitation, difficulty swallowing, and/or heartburn that is no longer responsive to acid-blocking medications.
  • Strangulated hernia or obstruction – symptoms including the inability to have a bowel movement or pass gas, severe pain with eating, or persistent nausea.

A defect, or abnormal opening, in the muscle or connective tissue layers that make up the abdominal wall caused by a weakness in the layers of the abdominal wall.

Symptoms:

  • A pain associated with a bulge in the groin, the bellybutton, or through a prior incision site from surgery.

Surgery:

  • These procedures are done through an open incision or laparoscopically (through small incisions) depending on the type of hernia and work required for repair.

For children, hernia development can be congenital and adults can develop this type of hernia as a result of strenuous activities, chronic cough, or chronic straining from difficulties with bowel movements or urination.

Symptoms:

  • Pain associated with a bulge in the groin is the first sign of an inguinal hernia. It can be a sharp pain or an ache that gradually gets worse.
  • Signs of entrapment are tenderness, redness of the overlying sking, severe unceasing pain, and the bulge not being able to be reduced or pushed back in.

These are serious symptoms that must be treated immediately.

Surgery:

  • There are two general options for inguinal hernia repair: the open approach and the laparoscopic approach.
  • Our surgeons specialize in the laparoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair offering patients a shorter recovery and sooner return to daily activities.
  • For laparoscopic hernia repair, primary complications associated with the operation are not common.
  • For many patients, there can be swelling and bruising of the abdominal wall and scrotal region. This is normal and will steadily resolve completely with time.

Forms in a previous incision from prior surgery  and is usually due to inadequate healing or excessive pressure on the abdominal wall scar. The incidence of a hernia forming in a previous abdominal scar is about 20% (or higher for people who are obese or active smokers).

Symptoms:

  • Pain is usually the first symptom regardless if they have a bulge or not.
  • Once the bulge is present, it can increase in size and gradually cause more symptoms such as nausea and vomiting.
  • If internal organs such as intestine becomes entrapped in the hernia defect, this can be life-threatening if left undiagnosed and untreated.

Surgery:

  • An incisional hernia is largely dependent on reducing or eliminating the tension present at the surgical site.
  • The method that is preferred by most hernia surgeons is a tension-free method and is used by most medical centers.

Appears as a grape sized lump in the inner or upper part of the thigh or groin.

Symptoms & Causes:

  • Painful lump that may disappear when you lie down.
  • Can occur when fatty tissue or part of an intestine, protrudes through into the groin area at the top of the inner thigh through a weak spot in the surrounding muscle wall of the abdomen and into the femoral canal.
  • Femoral hernias tend to occur more frequently in women due to the wider shape of the female pelvis.

Surgery:

  • The operation pushes the bulge back into place and helps to strengthen the abdominal wall.
  • Femoral hernia repair is a necessary procedure as this type of hernia has a high risk of intestinal strangulation, which is a potentially life-threatening.
  • Femoral hernia repair can be done through open surgery, or through laparoscopic surgery.
  • Femoral hernia repair has very few risks.

A protrusion, or abnormal bulge, that can be felt or seen over the belly button.

Symptoms & Causes:

  • This condition develops when a portion of the intestine protrudes through the muscle of the abdominal wall.
  • Umbilical hernias in children are caused by an opening in the abdominal wall that is present at birth.
  • The bulge can be seen and felt all the time or this protrusion may disappear when the child is relaxed.
  • Entrapment of internal organs such as intestine (persistent nausea and vomiting with severe abdominal pain and inability to pass gas or stool may have intestinal entrapment).

Surgery:

  • A small incision will be made at the base of the belly button where the bulging intestine where the intestine can be pushed back into its proper place, while the hernia sac is removed.
  • Multiple stitches are put in place around the muscle wall to prevent another hernia. The skin around the belly button will be then sewn down and attached to the underlying muscle so that the belly button looks like an “innie” instead of an “outie.”
  • In children, most umbilical hernias will go away on their own by age 3 or 4. If the defect is greater than 2cm in diameter, it will need to be surgically repaired.
  • For adults, the decision to repair an umbilical hernia with mesh depends on the size of the hernia defect found at the time of surgery.
  • In adults, any symptomatic umbilical hernia should be evaluated for repair.

A strain or tear of the soft tissues in the groin area.  There is usually not a detectable hernia by exam or by imaging.

Symptoms & Causes

  • Commonly seen in athletes whose activity requires sudden change of directions, cutting movements, or twisting motions such as in ice hockey, soccer, wrestling, and football.
  • A Sports Hernia typically presents with acute pain in the groin area, or pain that progressively worsens over time and is exaggerated by certain movements.

Treatment

  • The first phase of treatment for an acute Sports Hernia is rest.
  • Your Sports Hernia specialist may also recommend ice, and anti-inflammatory medication for several weeks.
  • The second phase of treatment for Sports Hernia typically involves 6-8 weeks of physical therapy, concentrating on strengthening and balancing the muscles in the area of injury.

Talk To An Expert Today

**The information on this website is not an alternative to medical advice from your regular physician. Our health advice is not intended as medical diagnosis or treatment; consult your regular physician before beginning the bariatric process. This site is for educational purposes only, and does not replace the need for a formal consultation with a surgeon before undergoing a surgical procedure or receiving treatment. The content/images on this website are not a guarantee of individual results. Individual results may vary.

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